Instead of hitting the ball, a Korean father clubs his son in the middle of a well-manicured green golf course because the son cannot make a good hit. He hits the crying baby repeatedly, surprising other golfers.

The beating continues and a man named Rodrigo Duterte enters to pacify. But the Korean national refuses to budge, apparently lacking in knowledge of who Duterte is. The Korean barks at Duterte while the nervous son wipes his tears, smears of it clear on his cheeks.

The Korean lifts his right arm, swinging the club towards his son's head. A blood spurts seconds after. A club falls, barely creating a rattle as it hits the ground. The boy stands in awe, watching his father blooded head.



c(@_@)a

Sure I was not there when that incident happened. I only learned of the story when it was carried as a backgrounder for a newspaper report on deported Koreans. Perhaps my account is different from what really happened.

It could be far from what really ensued. It could be close. I'm sure the older Korean was hurt much more than his son was when he clubbed him repeatedly for performing poorly in golf. He could have been hit on his head or on his face. Wherever he was hit, what's important is, he was stopped from hitting his poor child when he himself got hit by no less than Duterte.


Duterte admitted hitting the Korean and later asking the Bureau of Immigration to send the Korean back to his country.

Like most major cities of the Philippines, Davao has become a gracious host to thousands of Korean nationals who entered the country either as students or tourists. Later, a number of these Koreans have decided to settle here, investing in restaurants and tourism. But zoom in to their business ventures will make you understand how exclusive they are: visiting (and stay-in) Koreans eat at Korean Restaurants and travel around with Korean tour operators, onboard Korean buses.

So except for the hotels and small shops, English language teachers, and the Ateneo de Davao University, no one in Davao is actually benefiting from the Koreans, officials said.



A number of those who study at the Ateneo de Davao University (their top choice, I guess) I find really hot.They reinforce my fancy for the mukhang-parang-tanga men. But as their stay here is dragging for many more years, the graciousness of their own host they challenge; the hospitality they abuse.

Imagine these Koreans smoking even at a crowded hotel lobbies when a city ordinance banning smoking in public places such as hotels lobbies (except for designated areas that resemble gas chambers)is still in place. Imagine them walking at hotel lobbies shirtless and dripping.

Councilor Bonifacio Militar said at least 18 Korean companies in Davao are allegedly circumventing Philippine laws, on top of these is their failure to remit social security payments of their employees to the Social Security System (SSS, aside from the fact that they pay wages way below the mandated minimum wage.

These abuses and more while they are in Davao. I could only imagine what's happening in Korea.



c(@_@)a

Sunday morning, an incensed Duterte appeard on his television program threatening to arrest Koreans he will find violating the anti-smoking ordinance. He also threatened to shut-down the Apo View Hotel, the hole of the alleged abusive Koreans.

Read this story for more.

17 comments:

Yas Ligtas said...

I always wanted to make a shirt that says "Koreans go home". They seem to be rubbing more of their arrogance here...

But I did have a Korean friend once, his (English) name was Stephen and he was nice. He wasn't the type that went shopping and drinking all the time though, preferred to stay indoors and was very interesting to talk with.

Daniel Ted said...

According to studies and researches, Koreans are naturally rude and mean. Here in Baguio City, they are everywhere. There is not a day i don't meet twenty of them in the street. Anyway, i haven't personally met one so i can't judge them. But most of my friends say they have rather bad experiences with them.

MANDAYA MOORE: Ang bayot sa bukid said...

Kailangan natin si Jumong para iligtas ang mga mamamayan ng Davao sa kamay ng abusadong Digong.

bananas said...

Mandaya, bakit si Digong? hahahaha

Kiks said...

Hindi dapat ang mga Koreano ang sisihin. Let's see what the gobyerno is upto with all this influx shit of Koreans into our lands.

I actually find Koreans nice and very amiable. And most of them men, day, sintigas ng batong matatagpuan pero di makakain sa balut!

As for Dutdut, kailan kaya sya makakatikim ng sarili nyang medisina?

ruff nurse-du-jour said...

Aside from their porcelain-like complexion and chinky little eyes, I find most Koreans cold and heartless. Ewan ko ba, except siguro when they indulge my huge “tawad-s” in their shops here in Manila. But that race of Sandara Park should be given due credit for providing Pinoys some job (ie., teaching English), some investments (ie., tiangge), and some headaches (ie., illegal stay as aliens).

ruff nurse-du-jour said...

Aside from their porcelain-like complexion and chinky little eyes, I find most Koreans cold and heartless. Ewan ko ba, except siguro when they indulge my huge “tawad-s” in their shops here in Manila. But that race of Sandara Park should be given due credit for providing Pinoys some job (ie., teaching English), some investments (ie., tiangge), and some headaches (ie., illegal stay as aliens).

johnnypanic said...

i have two former classmates who work for an English Language School run by a Korean. let me say, he's much nicer to his American guests.

tin-tin said...

about the story.. grabe naman yung tatay na yun! i researched who duterte is... safest place pala ang davao. hehe. sorry ha. di ako masyadong informed sa current events and politics. hahaha.

and super nagkalat nga ang koreans.. everywhere you go. i think sa capiz lang ako walang nakitang koreano. hay naku! koreans should be taught talaga. they should know how to respect our country.. and we filipinos, should know how to take care of our country. baka mamaya, mas marami nang koreano than filipinos dito

amicus said...

this is invasion. waaah! :-)

Chyt said...

So Davao is very much like Baguio City. As Daniel Ted said, they are everywhere that our air smells not of pine but of kimchi (I am not being racist. I love kimchi. I'm just stressing the Korean invasion of my birthplace.) I think the Bureau of Immigration was abolished while we were sleeping. With the millions of Koreans and business establishments around, an immigration office, if it does exist, ought to be alarmed.

I have a Korean friend who tells me that some Koreans come on the pretext of being missionaries so that they can get 10-year visas. Students get 2-year visas. No wonder there are so many Korean missionaries. If they are really missionaries, why don't they stay in Korea where less people believe in Jesus Christ?

Chyt said...

BTW, I like your blog. I will include it in my blogroll.

bananas said...

hi chyt, salamat sa pagbisita. nasa listahan na rin kita maam.

Lyka Bergen said...

Oh Yeah? .... bongga ang Duterte!

Have you seen Nicole Kidman's The Invasion? Parang ganon!

Zero to Bitch in 3 seconds said...

its not just the koreans... the government has something to do with this too. i mean seriously...

but koreans are fun/ny. i can;t judge the whole korean community because i havent dealt with all of them, but from what i saw... they're pretty nice.

chase said...

i have nothing against koreans.
but i guess they've gotten a bit abusive.

ganahan ko ni duterte dah..
way to go.
astig na astig jud na inyong mayor.

abssss said...

A friend of mine had a ver close encounter with a Korean guy. He said he was uncut, and this Korean is nice. They are here for the cheap English education. I think the government should raise the tuition fees to 10 times of what we pay.